Teen Pregnancy Campaign Jams Call-in Lines

By Jon Hargreaves

After only one month, the ‘Kickout Teenage Pregnancy” campaign (Piga teke mimba za mapema in Swahili) by HCR partner-station Amani FM in eastern Kenya, has been so successful, the call-in lines are jammed.  The team has been hosting talk shows, call-in programmes and getting out and about in the schools of Tana River County, to promote awareness of underage pregnancy. As Station Manager, Harriet Atyang explains, “We’ve been encouraging girls to follow their dreams and be aware of grooming by predatory men. Tana River County is among the four worst hit counties with this menace and is one of the major reasons it performs so poorly in the national exams,” she added

The station receives more than 300 phone calls per day and more than 200 sms text messages.  “In fact our call lines are getting so congested we are trying to get a third line and another phone to help ease the congestion,” says Harriet.

The station is using the Una Hakika SMS text reporting system, where listeners are given a short code which enables them to seek counselling or report any incidents where they feel threatened or at risk.

Harriet says the campaign is the talk of town and that the response has been overwhelming, hoping it will result in significant change in the community.

HCR is working across Africa and Asia, supporting communities in crisis, through community centred-media. For more information contact hcruk@h-c-r.org

All the world's greatest treasures!

By Celeste Larkins

Last week, Dane and I provided radio training at a camp for high achieving 10- and 11-year-old students who live in rural communities throughout the Mid West and Gascoyne. One student lived 200kms away from the nearest town on a cattle station with his family. It was a great opportunity for students to come together and socialise with other students of their age-level, as well as extend their learning. We facilitated a workshop to develop community service announcements (CSA) for Radio MAMA, who broadcast throughout the region. You could tell these students were from the ‘outback’ when their messages where around the themes of fire and road safety and environmental conservation. One student living on the coast in an area where many tourists visit developed this CSA around protecting coral and reef systems. We have never come across anyone so expressive!  

Time is running out!

By Jon Hargreaves

HCR does not drill wells! We support communities in crisis, through media. We work with partners who do this kind of thing. It’s not in our strategic plan. So we don’t drill wells…. usually that is!

But then sometimes, when the need is great, one has no choice. Which is why we’ve done it before !

And we need to do it again as time is running out for one marginalised Adivasi (indigenous tribal) community in Maharastra, India.

We have reached out to those who do drill wells as their core business, but they are unable to help. So we're going to drill a well!

Our grateful thanks to those who have enabled us to make this a reality.

For more information contact: hcruk@h-c-r.org



Celebrating 3 years of Amplifying Voices in Freetown

HCR joins with the Amplifying Voices through SALT Project in Sierra Leone to celebrate 3 years of strengthening communities and locally generated action with a big vision for the future.

BBN and community volunteers celebrate 3 years of AVS, Freetown, Jan 2019. (HCR UK, 2019)

BBN and community volunteers celebrate 3 years of AVS, Freetown, Jan 2019. (HCR UK, 2019)

There is much to celebrate! The project is actively working in 7 communities in Freetown with a strong group of volunteers from the community, clinic and the churches who regularly meet with people in their homes and their communities to listen to and appreciate their concerns, their hopes and their strengths. This way of working is generating positive local actions by the community themselves. People are seeing their potential and ability to create change in their own lives and community not waiting for outside help to fix everything. In three years we have witnessed tangible, measurable and material changes including pipe borne water, feeder road construction and community centre construction. Some intangible changes though significant have been improved dialogue between stakeholders, stronger participation in community projects and improved social capital of the community volunteers we work with. Through drama and magazine programmes on radio, our local partner, Believers Broadcasting Network (BBN) is amplifying the stories from these communities to highlight what people care about, to generate further action by other key people and encourage other communities to have hope.

With HCR, BBN is going deeper.  Ransford Wright, CEO of BBN says:

We have started going further and engaged in our first community meetings. We are moving into the next phase and we have a big vision where we will reach further and deeper. With our communities we want to bring out the more hidden voices in our community, we want to address poverty and build community cohesion.

BBN (Believers Broadcast Network) is a large Christian Radio Station and counselling centre working with churches, local people and health facilities to strengthen people’s resilience, health and well- being by promoting effective engagement with service providers and using the radio to amplify Voices in the Local Community. SALT is an acronym meaning Strength, Amplify, Listen and Transformation. The project was started to support post Ebola recovery by promoting healing after the epidemic.

 

Education: a right for all children

By Celeste Larkins

Approximately 264 million children and adolescents around the world do not have the opportunity to enter or complete school. They dream of a life where they can have an education. Working in international development, we know education is a key factor in reducing the poverty cycle. 

In Australia, we are extremely lucky to have public education for all children, which is why it might sound surprising that in some communities, there are children missing out on years of school or even their entire schooling. This has huge ramifications for their future abilities to live a fulfilling purposeful life.

In Carnarvon, a small town we work, school non-attendance is high, and with the support of community, government and supporting organisations changing attitudes and the culture of schooling and education is a key priority area. 

There are many reasons why education is not a priority and after going on the school pick up bus you can see larger social issues which prevent children going to school exist. Run-down and insecure housing, family alcohol and other drug issues, lack of food security. Talking with locals, many of these social issues exist due to intergenerational trauma from past Government policies, including the Stolen Generation.

Children were taken from their families and to be brought up in institutions, fostered out or adopted by white families. Children lost their connection to family, culture, land and language. Not only does this contribute largely to current social issues within Aboriginal communities, but also has create a sense of distrust to ‘white’ education (AIATSIS).

However, with the support of the community, the school and the local Remote School Attendance Strategy team (who are part of Ngala Midwest & Gascoyne), there has been progress in supporting parents to get their children to school, and change the current perception. This takes a lot of dedicated people and a holistic approach to support families. Local leaders identify education is important for their community’s future, but are also passionate in passing down traditional culture. 

For the past few years we have been working with the Carnarvon community and the Remote School Attendance Strategy team to develop local video and radio content to promote school and education. We have spoken with Elders, right through to kindy students about what education means to them. Recently we developed a set of videos which the Carnarvon community engaged with and we had great feedback. You can check one of them out here